Rummanah Aasi
Description: After losing out on a spot on the local deaf team, William practiced even harder—eventually earning a position on a professional team. But his struggle was far from over. In addition to the prejudice Hoy faced, he could not hear the umpires' calls. One day he asked the umpire to use hand signals: strike, ball, out. That day he not only got on base but also changed the way the game was played forever. William “Dummy" Hoy became one of the greatest and most beloved players of his time!

Review: I never heard of William Hoy before picking this book up. What a remarkable story! Born in 1862, William Hoy could neither hear nor speak, but he loved and breathed baseball. Despite his disabilities, he was incredibly athletically gifted and became an outstanding major league baseball player during the late nineteenth century. It is said that he and along with other players are credited in creating a system of hand gestures as signs that are still used in baseball today. The illustrations remind of the old Popeye cartoons that are fun to look at and share the book's uplifting vibe and feel good message. This is a great story for baseball and sports fan to read. It would also work as a good read-aloud with younger readers.

Rating: 4 stars

Words of Caution: None. Recommended for Preschools to Grade 3 readers.

If you like this book try: Brothers at Bat: The True Story of an Amazing All-Brother Baseball Team by Audrey Vernick


Description: Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has spent a lifetime disagreeing: disagreeing with inequality, arguing against unfair treatment, and standing up for what’s right for people everywhere. This biographical picture book about the Notorious RBG, tells the justice’s story through the lens of her many famous dissents, or disagreements.

Review: I Dissent is an informative picture book biography of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The book traces the Justice's achievements as an intelligent, ambitious young girl to her position on the Supreme Court with an emphasis on dissenting in the face of inequality that Gingsburg faced as a Jewish woman. While the book does talk briefly about Gingsburg's social life, the focus for the majority of the book is her law career. The text is easy to understand sentences intended for its audience. The whimsical illustrations make the subject approachable and the use of bold typography highlight words such as protest, object, and dissent make the text come alive.

Rating: 4 stars

Words of Caution: None. Recommended for Grades 3 and up.

If you like this book try: Ruth Bader Gingsburg by Heather Moore Niver


Description: "Pinkalicious" meets National Geographic in this nonfiction picture book introducing the weirdest, wildest, pinkest critters in the animal kingdom! Some people think pink is a pretty color. A fluffy, sparkly, princess-y color. But it's so much more. Sure, pink is the color of princesses and bubblegum, but it's also the color of monster slugs and poisonous insects. Not to mention ultra-intelligent dolphins, naked mole rats and bizarre, bloated blobfish. Isn't it about time to rethink pink?

Review: Young readers who are fascinated by animals or weird things will absolutely love Pink is for Blobfish. Rather than focusing on a region or behavior, this book of weird creatures is uniquely organized by color. The color of choice is pink and the creatures featured in the book are from cute, cuddly, princessy and other adjectives associated with pink. Most of the creatures listed where foreign to me from the ugly, flesh-colored blobfish and the bristly hairy squat lobster to the delicate pink fairy armadillo, I mistook as feather duster. Each creature baffled me as I flipped through this book. A two page spread is dedicated to each animal which features a full-color, close-up photo of the creature with an approachable paragraph describing some of its key features, a fascinating fact, and an at-a-glance rundown of basic facts. The comical tone makes book inviting in case the book's title and cover doesn't grab your little reader instantly.

Curriculum Connection: Science

Rating: 4 stars

Words of Caution: None. Recommended for K-Grade 4 readers.

If you like this book try: What Makes a Monster? by Jess Keating
2 Responses
  1. Anne Bennett Says:

    What fun choices for your summer reading. I've never head of Hoy either, but it is amazing that the hand signals he needed to lay the game are still used today.//My husband read Ginsberg's autobiography, The BFG, last year and keeps reminding me that i need to read it, too.


  2. Kindlemom Says:

    It looks like these were all quite good! I will keep some of them in mind for my girls!


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