Rummanah Aasi
Description: Miles Morales is just your average teenager. Dinner every Sunday with his parents, chilling out playing old-school video games with his best friend, Ganke, crushing on brainy, beautiful poet Alicia. He's even got a scholarship spot at the prestigious Brooklyn Visions Academy. Oh yeah, and he's Spider Man.
   But lately, Miles's spidey-sense has been on the fritz. When a misunderstanding leads to his suspension from school, Miles begins to question his abilities. After all, his dad and uncle were Brooklyn jack-boys with criminal records. Maybe kids like Miles aren't meant to be superheroes. Maybe Miles should take his dad's advice and focus on saving himself.
  As Miles tries to get his school life back on track, he can't shake the vivid nightmares that continue to haunt him. Nor can he avoid the relentless buzz of his spidey-sense every day in history class, amidst his teacher's lectures on the historical "benefits" of slavery and the importance of the modern-day prison system. But after his scholarship is threatened, Miles uncovers a chilling plot, one that puts his friends, his neighborhood, and himself at risk. It's time for Miles to suit up.

Review: I was first introduced to Miles Morales in one of the volumes of Ms. Marvel graphic novels. I didn't know much about him besides the fact that he was Spider-Man so I was really excited when I found out that Jason Reynolds was tapped by Marvel to write a Miles Morales book. After reading quite a few of Reynolds' other books I knew that Miles Morales was in very capable hands.
  I very much appreciated that Reynolds moved beyond an origin story and the novelization of a graphic novel. This book is more interested in Miles' personal journey grappling with his identity of being a half black/half Puerto Rican teen and a superhero, both of which limit and define him.
 Miles is an incredibly smart, loyal, and responsible teen. He is keenly aware of his surroundings and social status. Unlike many students in his elite prep school, Miles is a scholarship student who comes from the Brooklyn projects where crime is a way of life. His parents are tough but they fiercely love their son and want what is best for him.
  Reynolds also addresses racism in the book both explicitly and implicitly throughout the book. Miles' history teacher is racist and proclaims that slavery was beneficial in America and African Americans were better off because of it. I had a really hard time with this teacher especially because it is unfortunately very timely today. I also understood how helpless Miles felt in confronting the teacher given the fact that his father is an ex-convict, Miles knows that society also expects him to follow the same footsteps into crime. Though Miles got his powers from his uncle Aaron's criminal past, Miles is always at a crosswords on what type of person he can become. While surviving his junior year at high school and all the angst that comes along with it, Miles can't help but worry if he too will become a victim of nature or a nurturer who will break the glass ceiling that was placed above him.
  I will admit that the superhero aspect of the book was a bit clunky at times, but given the fact that the character development and themes were so strong that this didn't bother me as much. The villain felt a bit flat and underdeveloped, especially since he appeared after the half way mark of the book. I really hope there is another book featuring Miles since there are so many other aspects of his character and the book's themes to explore.  

Rating: 4 stars

Words of Caution: There is some language in the book. Recommended for Grades 6 and up.

If you like this book try: Miles Morales, The Ultimate Spider-Man Edition graphic novel series by Brian Bendis, Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo, Black Widow by Margaret Strohl
2 Responses
  1. Kindlemom Says:

    I love that this isn't your typical graphic novel that there is some diversity mixed in with the superhero stuff. I really want to take a closer look at this now, I think I have a daughter that will love it. ;) Wonderful review!


  2. I love super hero books, so sad that this wasn't better exectued.


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