Rummanah Aasi

Description: Kamran Smith has it all. He’s the star of the football team, dates the most popular girl, and can’t wait to enlist in the army like his big brother, Darius. Although Kamran’s mother is from Iran, Kamran has always felt 100% American. Accepted. And then everything implodes. Darius is accused of being a terrorist. Kamran refuses to believe it. But Darius has been filmed making threats against his country, hinting at an upcoming deadly attack. Suddenly, everyone in Kamran’s life turns against him and his family. Kamran knows it’s up to him to clear his brother’s name. In a race against time, Kamran must piece together a series of clues and codes that will lead him to Darius—and the truth. But is it a truth Kamran is ready to face? And is he putting his own life at risk?

Review: I was hesitant in picking up Code of Honor due to its cover and the subject of terrorism and featuring a Muslim teen. Thankfully, the book avoids stereotypes and is a fast paced spy thriller. Kamran is an Iranian American teen who has always considered himself "fully American". He is dating one of the most popular girls in school, a star athlete, and a homecoming king contender. He plans to follow his older brother and idol, Darius, and attend West Point for college. All of this changes when authorities identify his brother as a deserter and terrorist, responsible for the bombing of the U.S. embassy in Turkey and the deaths of 53 people.
  Suddenly, Kamran is ostracized by his friends, girlfriend, and classmates. He is labeled a terrorist and then taken into custody and held as a prisoner by the U.S. government. Despite days of questioning and watching videos of Darius, the teen refuses to acknowledge that his brother is a terrorist. As he pays closer attention to the videos, he realizes that his brother is trying to give him information about terrorist plans by using scenarios from games the two used to play and the Code of Honor they signed when they were children. With help from surprising sources, Kamran escapes and heads out to find his sibling.
  Gratz has managed to take a ripped from the headlines plot and add layers of suspense, intrigue, and danger into the scene. Since this is a middle grade/YA novel, you will have to suspend your disbelief in how Kamran manages to stay ahead and survive dangerous incidents. There are lots of action scenes and close calls that will keep readers turning the page to see what is next. Kamran and Darius are both well developed characters. Kamran's wide range of emotions such as anger, doubt, rage, and faith in his brother feel authentic. I also like that the story addresses questions about patriotism, loyalty, and trust.

Words of Caution: There is some strong violence and minor language. Recommended for Grades 8 and up.


If you like this book try: First Strike by Jack Higgins, Alex Rider series by Anthony Horowitz
2 Responses
  1. I, too, worried about stereotyping, but I think Gratz did a good job (as usual).


  2. Anne Bennett Says:

    I bet this book will be popular in your library fter you book talk this one.


Post a Comment

Related Posts with Thumbnails